Lifestyle

Vitamin A intake linked with lower skin cancer risk: Study

Aug, 03: Intake of vitamin A may be associated with a lower risk of a common type of skin cancer, a study claims.

The study of about 125,000 Americans found that people with the highest intake of vitamin A lowered their risk of squamous cell skin cancer by around 15 per cent.

Most of the vitamin A they consumed came from foods, according to the study published in the journal JAMA Dermatology.

“These findings just add another reason to have a healthy diet with fruits and vegetables. Vitamin A from plant sources is safe,” said Eunyoung Cho, an associate professor at Brown University in the US.

Healthy food sources of vitamin A include sweet potato, cantaloupe, carrots, black-eyed peas, sweet red peppers, broccoli, spinach, dairy foods, fish and meat, especially liver, according to the US National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin. That means it can collect in the fat cells.

However, when taken in large amounts — like those in supplements — people can potentially reach an unsafe level of vitamin A, according to the NIH.

Adults shouldn’t consume more than 10,000 international units (IU) of preformed vitamin A daily, the NIH said.

Cho said too much preformed vitamin A — typically from supplements and some animal foods — increases the risk of osteoporosis and hip fractures.

(The Indian Express)

Related posts

New cell discovery could make liver transplants redundan

Online Editor

Malaria: Know the causes, symptoms and treatment and keep yourself safe this monsoon

Online Editor

New cell that can heal hearts discovered

Online Editor